F&Q

1.What Is NFC?
Near Field Communication (NFC) is a standards-based short-range wireless connectivity technology that makes life easier and more convenient for consumers around the world by making it simpler to make transactions, exchange digital content, and connect electronic devices with a touch. NFC is compatible with hundreds of millions of contactless cards and readers already deployed worldwide.
Retrieved from:https://nfc-forum.org/what-is-nfc/
2. What's difference between RFID & NFC technology?

RFID is the process by which items are uniquely identified using radio waves, and NFC is a specialized subset within the family of RFID technology. Specifically, NFC is a branch of High-Frequency (HF) RFID, and both operate at the 13.56 MHz frequency. NFC is designed to be a secure form of data exchange, and an NFC device is capable of being both an NFC reader and an NFC tag. This unique feature allows NFC devices to communicate peer-to-peer.

3. How secure is NFC technology?
Many experts say NFC really is fundamentally secure by virtue of its extremely short range. In order to snag your NFC signal, a hacker would need to be very close to you. Uncomfortably close. In other words, you'd know they were there. And unless it was a very intimate friend of yours, you'd likely not be happy about it.There's more to the physical aspects of NFC that make it troublesome for even determined hackers.
4.NFC and the Internet of Things
The Internet of Things promises a world in which physical objects of all kinds — from household systems to health monitors — are able to collect and exchange data. It’s an attractive prospect, enabling remarkable efficiency and productivity, less data re-entry, easier control, and the many benefits of data analytics. But there are challenges in implementing the Internet of Things. For example, how can you ensure a network connection for an object? How do connected objects know a user’s intent? What about security? And how do you connect unpowered objects that lack nearby Internet access? NFC answers all of these questions by delivering: ·Easy network access and data sharing — NFC makes the process of connecting devices easy and intuitive. There’s no lengthy handshaking or data entry requirements. Just tap and go. ·User control with expressed intent — NFC offers a simple, intuitive means of indicating the user’s intent to initiate action. A quick tap makes it clear. ·Data security at multiple levels — Wide-open networks allow opportunities for hackers. NFC counters with built-in features that limit opportunities for eavesdropping, and easy-to-deploy options for additional protections to match each use case. ·The ability to connect the unconnected — NFC solves the problem of unpowered objects that lack network access. By embedding NFC tags in unpowered, unconnected objects, you can add intelligence anywhere. With a tap of an NFC-enabled device, it can open a URL and provide access to online information. With 38.5 billion connected devices expected by 2020 and over one billion NFC-enabled devices already in the market, NFC is playing a key role in making the Internet of Things a working reality.
Retrieved from:https://nfc-forum.org/nfc-and-the-internet-of-things/